Villains 102-8

A good story has a protagonist, goals, and opposition. Opposition includes obstacles and forces of nature, but typically opposition also takes the form of a character. Sometimes the opposition is another protagonist, leaving the audience to choose who they want to root for, but many stories include at least one villain, a character that is definitively “wrong”. Villains can be narrative or mechanical.

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Heroes 102-07

Stories frequently show how characters grow to become heroes, or demonstrate and prove that a character is a hero. A hero represents an ideal, the ability to set aside selfish desires and work for the sake of others, sometimes sacrificing personal goals in the process. In a word, altruism. Heroes live by a moral code, with the will to endure, resist temptation, and help others.

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Admirable Virtues 102-6

Audiences need to like the protagonist(s), to both relate to and admire them. People often relate to characters that remind them of themselves; characters who face similar types of problems. People often admire characters that demonstrate a skill or proficiency, particularly if that skill demonstrates altruistic motives, such as teaching or medicine, or if it has a strong visual appeal, such as performance arts or athletics. Intelligence is another admirable trait, though when it comes to brains a person can be smart, knowledgeable, or clever.

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